Auditor-General finds QBuild payroll also a mess

18 Nov 2010 2:55 PMJann Stuckey

18 November 2010

The Auditor-General has found similar avoidable flaws in QBuild’s new payroll system to Queensland Health – millions of dollars wasted and staff left unpaid, the State Opposition said today.

LNP Shadow Minister for Public Works and Information and Communication Technology Jann Stuckey said the Bligh government blew $32 million on the ‘Ellipse’ payroll system for QBuild which had been plagued with problems from its inception last November.

“Minister Robert Schwarten should read the Auditor-General’s report carefully because he’s responsible for another costly Bligh Labor payroll mess,” Ms Stuckey said.

“He’s blown $32 million of taxpayers’ money on a system that can’t produce financial statements for end-of-month reporting and can’t properly pay large numbers of staff.

“It’s all so very similar to the Health payroll disaster and Mr Schwarten needs to provide clear and definite answers to his staff on what steps are being taken to fix the mess.”

Auditor-General Glenn Poole states: “This was not inconsistent with my findings from the audit of QLD Health’s payroll system and demonstrates a critical need for improved system implementation skills within the public sector”*

Ms Stuckey said Mr Schwarten needed to stop passing the buck and instead accept some responsibility for these ongoing failures that are happening under his watch.   

“Mr Schwarten has proved he’s no better than Paul Lucas at managing his Department’s pay system …like Lucas he was given plenty of warnings but chose to ignore them.

“It’s another example of this Minister who is completely out of touch with his portfolio and worse, doesn’t seem to care about the personal suffering let alone the enormous waste of taxpayers’ money.”

Media contact: Jann Stuckey 0439 755 919

 
Auditor-General Report to Parliament No. 13 for 2010 | Executive summary – Page 3

*My audit of QBuild identified that project management controls were not consistently applied
across various stages of the system implementation. Governance structures were not effective in
communicating complete and timely information to various parties. The level of testing performed
prior to implementation was also unsatisfactory given that the robustness of QBuild’s financial
reporting and payroll processes were dependent on the rigour of this testing. This was not
inconsistent with my findings from the audit of Queensland Health’s payroll system and
demonstrates a critical need for improved system implementation skills within the public sector.